legend

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John Duncan (1866-1945), “Heptu bidding farewell to the city of obb” by sofi01 on Flickr.

“John Duncan was born in Dundee, Scotland in 1866. His father was a cattleman. John, however, had no interest in the family business and preferred the visual arts. By the age of 11 he was a student at the Dundee School of Art, then based at the High School of Dundee.
Called a madman by some and a mystic by others, Duncan admitted to hearing “faerie music” whilst he painted. Although his work remains strongly rooted in the Pre-Raphaelite movement, there is a certain graphical quality which sets it apart from his contemporaries and likens it to Art Nouveau, while the subject matter is thoroughly Celtic Revival —he is generally referred to as a “symbolist” by art critics. His interest in Celtic Revival was also shared by the Scottish singer Marjory Kennedy-Fraser; they eventually became close friends and Duncan painted her while on a trip to Eriskay in 1905.
His dreamy, mystical nature led him to fall in love with a woman whom he believed to have discovered the Holy Grail in a well in Glastonbury and who later divorced him. He never remarried and died in 1945.”
Apr 2, 2012 / 71 notes

John Duncan (1866-1945), “Heptu bidding farewell to the city of obb” by sofi01 on Flickr.

John Duncan was born in Dundee, Scotland in 1866. His father was a cattleman. John, however, had no interest in the family business and preferred the visual arts. By the age of 11 he was a student at the Dundee School of Art, then based at the High School of Dundee.

Called a madman by some and a mystic by others, Duncan admitted to hearing “faerie music” whilst he painted. Although his work remains strongly rooted in the Pre-Raphaelite movement, there is a certain graphical quality which sets it apart from his contemporaries and likens it to Art Nouveau, while the subject matter is thoroughly Celtic Revival —he is generally referred to as a “symbolist” by art critics. His interest in Celtic Revival was also shared by the Scottish singer Marjory Kennedy-Fraser; they eventually became close friends and Duncan painted her while on a trip to Eriskay in 1905.

His dreamy, mystical nature led him to fall in love with a woman whom he believed to have discovered the Holy Grail in a well in Glastonbury and who later divorced him. He never remarried and died in 1945.”

Macha  is a goddess of ancient Ireland, associated with war, horses, sovereignty, and the sites of Armagh and Emain Macha in County Armagh, which are named after her.
Jan 11, 2012 / 46 notes

Macha is a goddess of ancient Ireland, associated with war, horses, sovereignty, and the sites of Armagh and Emain Macha in County Armagh, which are named after her.

From The Mists of Avalon
Oct 17, 2011 / 13 notes

From The Mists of Avalon

(via allnaturalytwashedblipsterbitch)

Gustaf Tenggren
Jun 13, 2011 / 23 notes

Gustaf Tenggren

Walkyrien (c. 1905) by Emil Doepler
Feb 27, 2011 / 2 notes

Walkyrien (c. 1905) by Emil Doepler

 
The Valkyrie is, in the oldest strata of  belief, a corpse goddess, represented by the carrion-eating raven. The  name in Old Norse, valkyrja, means literally, “chooser of the slain.”  The Valkyrie is related to the Celtic warrior-goddess, the Morrigan, who  likewise may assume the form of the raven. Midway between the third and eleventh centuries, the Valkyries begin  assuming a more benign aspect. Small amulets and pictures on memorial  stones begin to depict the figure of the beautiful woman welcoming the  deceased hero with a horn of mead to the afterlife. Valkyries are  usually represented as blonde, blue eyed and fair skinned. They wear  scarlet corslets and carry shields and spears. By this later time, the Valkyries, as demigoddesses of death, had  their legend conflated with the folklore motif of the swan maiden (young  girls who are able to take on the form of a swan, sometimes as the  result of a curse). If one could capture and hold a swan maiden, or her  feathered cloak, one could extract a wish from her. This is why  valkyries were sometimes known as swan maidens or wish maidens. Although the sources consulted are not clear on this, the chief of  the Valkyries seems to have been the goddess Freyja. She is the Norse  goddess of love, fertility, and beauty, sometimes identified as the  goddess of battle and death. Blond, blue-eyed, and beautiful, Freyja  travels on a golden-bristled boar or in a chariot drawn by cats. She  resides in the celestial realm of Folkvang. Like Odinn, she received  half of those slain in battle, but since ladies go first she was allowed  first choice! Freyja possessed a magical cloak of falcon feathers that  allowed her to take the shape of a falcon if she wished, making the swan  maidens similar to the goddess by having “feather coats” or cloaks that  enable their shape-shifting abilities and the power of flight. The Valkyries carry out the will of Odinn in determining the victors  of the battle, and the course of the war. Their primary duty is to  choose the bravest of those who have been slain, gathering the souls of  dying heros or warriors found deserving of afterlife in Valhalla. They  scout the battle ground in search of mortals worthy of the grand hall.  If you are deemed by the Valkyries as un-worthy of the hall of Valhalla  you will be received after death by the goddess Hel in a cheerless  underground world. 

The Valkyrie’s Vigil (1906) by Edward Robert Hughes
Feb 19, 2011 / 37 notes

The Valkyrie is, in the oldest strata of belief, a corpse goddess, represented by the carrion-eating raven. The name in Old Norse, valkyrja, means literally, “chooser of the slain.” The Valkyrie is related to the Celtic warrior-goddess, the Morrigan, who likewise may assume the form of the raven.

Midway between the third and eleventh centuries, the Valkyries begin assuming a more benign aspect. Small amulets and pictures on memorial stones begin to depict the figure of the beautiful woman welcoming the deceased hero with a horn of mead to the afterlife. Valkyries are usually represented as blonde, blue eyed and fair skinned. They wear scarlet corslets and carry shields and spears.

By this later time, the Valkyries, as demigoddesses of death, had their legend conflated with the folklore motif of the swan maiden (young girls who are able to take on the form of a swan, sometimes as the result of a curse). If one could capture and hold a swan maiden, or her feathered cloak, one could extract a wish from her. This is why valkyries were sometimes known as swan maidens or wish maidens.

Although the sources consulted are not clear on this, the chief of the Valkyries seems to have been the goddess Freyja. She is the Norse goddess of love, fertility, and beauty, sometimes identified as the goddess of battle and death. Blond, blue-eyed, and beautiful, Freyja travels on a golden-bristled boar or in a chariot drawn by cats. She resides in the celestial realm of Folkvang. Like Odinn, she received half of those slain in battle, but since ladies go first she was allowed first choice! Freyja possessed a magical cloak of falcon feathers that allowed her to take the shape of a falcon if she wished, making the swan maidens similar to the goddess by having “feather coats” or cloaks that enable their shape-shifting abilities and the power of flight.

The Valkyries carry out the will of Odinn in determining the victors of the battle, and the course of the war. Their primary duty is to choose the bravest of those who have been slain, gathering the souls of dying heros or warriors found deserving of afterlife in Valhalla. They scout the battle ground in search of mortals worthy of the grand hall. If you are deemed by the Valkyries as un-worthy of the hall of Valhalla you will be received after death by the goddess Hel in a cheerless underground world.


The Valkyrie’s Vigil (1906) by Edward Robert Hughes